Typical American Families - Ideas Challenge Finalist (Atlanta)

From Where I Stand

From Where I Stand

It was my distinct honor to be chosen to photograph this campaign.

From Where I Stand is a social marketing campaign targeting young black gay men. The goals of the campaign are to decrease HIV stigma among young black gay men and increase positive identity development.

Photography by Carlton Mackey

Funding for this campaign was made possible by a cooperative agreement between AID Atlanta and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 More at www.fromwhereistand.org

Atlanta Music Project

Atlanta Music Project

The Atlanta Music project culminated our long partnership with a concert dedicated to me at the Emory University Center for Ethics. When I looked at the program and saw the dedication, I was so moved.

In February 2011, I began a year-long photo documentary project with coverage of the Atlanta Music Project’s 2011 Winter Performance which took place at Museum Bar. When the project ended in March 2012, the Atlanta Music Project took possession of a digital photography archive of over 1000 photos I took over the course of a year chronicling the progression of the Atlanta Music Project youth.

Modeled on El Sistema, Venezuela’s National System Of Youth And Children’s Orchestras, the Atlanta Music Project is a 5-day-a-week, after school program, youth orchestra and choir program targeting underserved communities in metropolitan Atlanta.

www.atlantamusicproject.org

 In October 2012, I joined a team of artists, activists, and every day people with compassion at the invitation of an Atlanta non-profit called Trashwater on a journey to Los Brasiles Nicaragua.  There I created a photographic documentary, a school yearbook, had my heart broken, and had it refilled with hope.   Trashwater  is a non-profit providing innovative, clean water solutions through partnerships with communities in developing nations.  At  Trashwater.org , we envision a day when every community will have access to safe water supplies. It is easy to take for granted ready access to a safe supply of drinking water, yet nearly one billion people lack this most basic necessity. Creating accessible, safe water supplies in developing countries liberates people to live healthier, fuller, more productive lives. 

In October 2012, I joined a team of artists, activists, and every day people with compassion at the invitation of an Atlanta non-profit called Trashwater on a journey to Los Brasiles Nicaragua.  There I created a photographic documentary, a school yearbook, had my heart broken, and had it refilled with hope.

Trashwater is a non-profit providing innovative, clean water solutions through partnerships with communities in developing nations.  At Trashwater.org, we envision a day when every community will have access to safe water supplies. It is easy to take for granted ready access to a safe supply of drinking water, yet nearly one billion people lack this most basic necessity. Creating accessible, safe water supplies in developing countries liberates people to live healthier, fuller, more productive lives. 

Journey to Jordan, Israel, Palestine

Journey to Jordan, Israel, Palestine

I  joined a group of artists, theologians, activists, and scholars  on a mission to: encounter the world's complexities, to hear stories of pain, liberation, hope and healing and to seek wisdom outside university walls.  The name of the program was JOURNEYS OF RECONCILIATION.

We traveled to Jordan then Israel and Palestine.  Upon our return I had more questions than answers.

Images from the Journey were featured on CNN and Huffington Post.

 

FACES OF JAMAICA

FACES OF JAMAICA

In the Fall of 2011, I traveled to Jamaica with Dr. Noel Erskine a theologian, scholar, and professor who was raised in the Jamaican village in which the Rastafarian faith originated. We traveled from Ocho Rios to the remote Bobo Shanti in the hills of Bull Bay. Dr. Erskine is the author of the book From Garvey to Marley: Rastafari Theology.

Through this collection I seek to gain and to promote a deeper understanding of each of the distinct people who grace its pages and of the Rastafarian faith that, for some of them, is at the core of their understanding of themselves. My primary objective, though, is for the viewer to peer deeper into their own lives. This collection is as much about an examination of the self as it is about studying the faces of any of the individuals in these photos.

Though context is important, this portrait series was composed with the intention of creating a unique encounter between the viewer and the subject. Most are composed with very little background. Each solitary moment is designed to offer a glimpse of the particularities of another individual -hair texture, skin and eye color, the shape of each person's nose and mouth while at the same time never leaving enough room for the viewer to escape the feeling that they too are sharing information about themselves. But this sharing goes beyond physical appearance. It is an exchange of hopes and dreams, fears and pain, faith and commitment, innocence and wisdom.

These are the faces of everyday folks just like you and me. These are folks who call the same place home as the legendary Robert (Bob) Nesta Marley and the contemporary track sensation Usain Bolt. These are folks, however, who are not singularly defined by icons of popular culture or by a particular faith. They worship, sing, dance, work, make love, play, and express themselves in as many distinct ways as anywhere else in the world. They are certainly, however, shaped by the place they call home.

These are some of the people who live on the island of Jamaica. These are their faces.

-Carlton Mackey

SEE COLLECTION

17 DEGREES AIN'T NOTHING - DOCUMENTARY FILM TRAILER

17 DEGREES AIN'T NOTHING

-a documentary film by Carlton Mackey and Dane Jefferson |http://www.17degreesaintnothing.com
A film that brings to the forefront issues surrounding homelessness in Atlanta. It places the story of 5 local individuals in the context of a global conversation about the economy, the recession, and the real life impact of it.

This project challenges our assumptions about homeless people.

It is a glimpse into their lives and a peering into our own.

1 FAMILY. 5 PEOPLE. 17 DEGREES.